Portland in Revolt!

In this episode, we talk with Jay and  Kay, two Portland street organizers, about the uprising that has shaken  the city and garnered so much media attention.  In the two months since  the murder of George Floyd, Portland has been out on the streets every  night demanding justice and racial justice.

Recently, the Trump  administration attempted to crack down on protests in an unprecedented  show of aggression by putting federal agents on the street, kidnapping  protestors off the street and responding with mass violence. The entire  city rose up against the federal government’s intervention, prompting a  pull back by the feds. But since then the Portland Police have continued  the violence against protests.

We discuss with our guests the background  of what’s been happening, organizing and street action tactics, the  courage of movements in Portland resisting the state every night, local  journalists that have been getting the story out and how to support the  continuing struggle.

You can support the PDX General Defense  Committee legal defense and bail fund  here:https://www.instagram.com/defensefundpdx/?hl=en

Continue reading “Portland in Revolt!”

Hiroshima and “Atomic Diplomacy,” 75 Years Later

What did they teach you in school about the dropping of the Atomic Bomb?

For years, large majorities of Americans  have believed that the U.S. had to use the A-Bomb against Japan on  August 6th, 1945 to end the war quickly and avoid a land war and thus  save one-million American lives.

Listen here: bit.ly/AtomicDiplomacy75

Scott and Bob discuss the use of the  bomb, why it was used as a message to the Soviet Union and not a  military necessity,  the chronology behind the development and  deployment of atomic weapons, the U.S. public response to it, and the  creation of a new history, a propaganda piece, regarding the use of the  bomb.  The dropping of the bomb on Hiroshima was vital in the  development of the Cold War, the arms race, the military-industrial  complex, and the National Security State.

Seventy-five years after the  first atomic weapon was used by the U.S., it’s still a highly-debated  and important topic.

This is also the debut of Green and Red on YouTube, so check us out at https://bit.ly/GreenAndRedOnYouTube

 

A Murder in Austin, w/ Anti-Police Brutality organizer Debbie Russell

We’re Back!  Lots of has been happening while we’ve been in break, so we start August atxby talking with veteran Austin community organizer, anti-police brutality advocate and Austin Legal Guild volunteer Debbie Russell (@Debmocracy) about the murder of Garrett Foster this past week, killed by a right-wing agitator who was driving his car into the crowd of peaceful protestors.

Listen here: bit.ly/ATXprotestGandR Continue reading “A Murder in Austin, w/ Anti-Police Brutality organizer Debbie Russell”

Racial Violence, the Camp Logan Mutiny, and Confederate Monuments w/ Professor Clayton Lust

Green & Red Podcast celebrates its 30th episode with our special guest, esteemed scholar and friend Professor Clayton Lust (@ClaytonLust) from Houston Community Collegconfederatee and Lone Star College, who has studied and written extensively about the Camp Logan Mutiny, a vital important yet unfortunately lesser-known historical episode where Houston Police and African American soldiers had a violent racial conflict in Houston in 1917. Given current political conditions and a rising awareness of Black history and Black interactions with police, the events at Camp Logan offer great insight into the history of policing among African Americans. Continue reading “Racial Violence, the Camp Logan Mutiny, and Confederate Monuments w/ Professor Clayton Lust”

Radical Seattle w/ Historian Cal Winslow

In our latest episode, Bob and Scott talk with historian Cal Winslow about the Seattle general strike of 1919. Labor actions and protests rad seattleare happening across the country and we take this moment to look back on one of the most important strikes in the 20th century. We discuss economic and social factors that set the stage for the strike, how the strike committee ran the city during the shutdown, the global backdrop and backlash.

Listen here: bit.ly/RadSeaGandR Continue reading “Radical Seattle w/ Historian Cal Winslow”

One Big Union? Not So Fast: Police Unions and Other Labor Struggles with author Joe Allen

In this episode we talk with author, journalist, historian, and socialist Joe Allen about police unions, fighting fascism and police brutality in Chicago, the UPS strike of 1997, labor organizing at “Big Brown” and democratic organizing in the labor movement. Continue reading “One Big Union? Not So Fast: Police Unions and Other Labor Struggles with author Joe Allen”

The End of the Age of Plastic with Stiv Wilson

In our latest episode, we talk with activist and filmmaker Stiv Wilson (@AgentStiv) from the Peak Plastic Foundation (@peakplastic) about the new film “The Story of Plastic.” We discuss the staggering problem of plastic pollution in our oceans and our communities. We also discuss how “the end of this story is just the beginning” as people around the world are now acting to break free from plastic. Continue reading “The End of the Age of Plastic with Stiv Wilson”

COVID19 vs. Reopening the Economy; Politics and the Pandemic w/ Prof. Sarah Koster

In our latest episode, Bob (@bobbuzzanco) and Scott (@sparki1969) get a return visit from Prof. Sarah Koster (@NotSoNormalNaCl) to discuss the recent spike in COVID19 infections. There are now over 2 million cases in the U.S. with the number of deaths at well over 119,000. Furthermore, Harvard University is now predicting that the number could almost double by the end of September. We discuss how political institutions, led by #BunkerBoy, continue to fail us in virus response, the racialization of the infection rate, and how to be “COVID19 responsible” when out in the streets during the current uprising against police violence. Continue reading “COVID19 vs. Reopening the Economy; Politics and the Pandemic w/ Prof. Sarah Koster”

Viet-Black Solidarity in a Time of Crisis with Professor Thao Ha

In this episode, we talked with Professor Thao Ha (@ThaoHaPhD)– Vietnamese refugee, esteemed scholar, and producer of a documentary on  Vietnamese-KKK conflict in Texas, “Seadrift.”  We had a fascinating  conversation about immigrant groups in the U.S., Solidarity during the  current rebellions, Vietnamese views on the Black community, the role of younger  Vietnamese in changing politics, and the future of Vietnamese-American  politics. Continue reading “Viet-Black Solidarity in a Time of Crisis with Professor Thao Ha”