Bob Dylan’s Birthday Bash–Green & Red Celebrates the legacy and meaning of Dylan. w/ Prof. Michael Foley

Bob Dylan is the most important political singer/songwriter of the 20th Century, and he turns 81 on May 24th, so we had a fantastic discussion with Michael Stewart Foley, one of the preeminent scholars of music and politics and author of “Fresh Fruit and Rotting Vegetables,” about the Dead Kennedys, and “Citizen Cash: The Political Life of Johnny Cash.”

Listen in: https://apple.co/3wF8yTs

Inside Oliver Stone’s Kennedy-Conspiracy-Complex

Cross-posted from Afflict the Comfortable

by Professor Robert Buzzanco

(I vanquished DiEugenio, so my challenge to Oliver Stone to debate is still on the table)

“When Oliver Stone heard it, he immediately called me, as he was excited about the result.” And thus Kent Dorfman James DiEugenio, aka “Jimmy Die,” received the imprimatur of his mentor and lord that he had done well.

Stone was referring to a debate I recently had with DiEugenio on the topic of the JFK assassination and the conspiracies Stone and others have laid out over the years, claiming that the “deep state,” including the military-industrial complex and intelligence agencies, and maybe even the Vice President’s office, had Kennedy killed because he was going soft on them—preparing to withdraw from Vietnam, normalize relations with Cuba, and end the Cold War.  (You can hear the debate here). DiEugenio has continued his barrage of insults directed at Noam Chomsky and me, along with the tired old theories and anecdotes and misinformation, so I’m writing a last response to him. If Oliver Stone wants to enter the debate, he’s always welcome to join Scott Parkin and me on Green & Red Podcast.

The Importance of Karl Marx w/ Prof. David McNally

David McNally is one of the more important Marxist scholars in the world, and we talked to him today on the anniversary of Karl Marx’s birth–May 5th, 1818.  McNally discussed a wide array of topics, including his introduction to Marxist thought, important texts to use to discover Marx’s writings, the importance of Marx’s concept of “alienated labor,” his formulation of class struggle, and why democracy is essential to socialism.

Listen in: https://apple.co/3MU7Xm6

We also discussed the history of Marx’s influence in European politics and how Americans came to discover Marx in the late 19th Century. And we finished with a discussion of why Marx remains relevant today and why Marxism is seeing a resurgence.

Encore Episode: Tin Soldiers and Nixon’s Coming . . . 52 Years After the Kent State Killings

It’s the 52nd anniversary of the killings at Kent State University. In a special encore episode, we’re reposting our Kent State episode from 2020.
In this episode, we commemorate the anniversary of the tragic events of May 4th, 1970 at Kent State University, where agents of the state murdered 4 students and shot 9 others. Students, who’d been told the war was winding down in Vietnam, erupted in protest at campuses all over  America when Richard Nixon  announced the U.S. invasion of Cambodia on April 30th. 

Best of G&R: May Day vs Labor Day. How the ruling class stops radical organizing.

Happy May Day tender comrades!  
Here is a repost of our May Day episode from 2021. In it, Bob and Scott talk about the history of May Day from pagan rituals to the Haymarket Affair to International Workers’ Day to Labor Day and Loyalty Day.  And we discuss how the ruling class’s “war on the left” fits into the politics of May Day vs. Labor Day.
Spend an hour of your International Workers’ Day weekend hearing about the history of May Day. You won’t regret it. 

Earth Day Special: The Fossil Fuel Resistance is Fertile.

The first Earth Day was in 1970 after decades of conservation and environmental advocacy from Rachel Carson’s “Silent Spring” to real life monkey wrenchers in the deserts of the American West. Since then, like so many other things, it has become by co-opted by corporations, politicians and non-profits looking to do well with environmentally minded consumers, voters and donors. In reality, change always comes from below. 
Listen in here: https://apple.co/3k4qDTT
In our Earth Day special episode, Bob interviews Scott about four moments in environmental history where communities led struggles against fossil fuel companies and governments. They dive into struggles against mountaintop removal coal mining in Appalachia, the southern leg of the Keystone XL pipeline, the Dakota Access Pipeline at Standing Rock and the community and grassroots led disaster relief after Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans. 

Ukraine and A Brief History of Atrocities in Warfare and Empire

Websters defines atrocity as “a shockingly bad or atrocious act, object, or situation.”

Russian atrocities on Ukrainian civilians have been the top of the 24 second news cycle since the invasion began. Since the advent of industrial warfare at the end of 19th century, war has been waged increasingly on civilian populations than opposing military forces. Wars of attrition have had the goal of subjecting the populace to “shockingly bad” actions to force the downfall of its ruling regime or submission of a resisting insurgency. The 20th century is full of examples of this by the British, the Germans, the Japanese, the Russians, and of course, the Americans.

Listen in: https://apple.co/3vt9eth

As the stories emerge from the war between Ukraine and Russia, detailing atrocities committed on civilian populations, we thought it was a good moment to talk about some of this history. We start with the Civil War and World War One (early industrial wars), the advent of air power, brutal occupations in Nanking, Korea and Vietnam, bombings of Dresden, Tokyo and Hiroshima, U.S. wars in Korea and Vietnam, Central American death squads and the forever wars in the Middle East.

Oliver Stone’s JFK Conspiracy: The Buzzanco-DiEugenio Debate

Recently G&R co-host and award-winning historian Bob Buzzanco debated Oliver Stone’s writer on his documentary “JFK Revisited,” James DiEugenio, about Stone’s theory that the “deep state” had JFK killed because he was going to withdraw from Vietnam, thaw relations with Castro, and end the Cold War.

Listen in: https://apple.co/3DRb37h

They discussed Kennedy’s actual policies as president, his aggressive actions in Vietnam and Cuba, his continued imperial approach to Latin America, his tough approach to the Soviet Union.  They also discussed the minutae of Oswald and the Warren Report, the “scenery” and “parlor games,” in Stone’s own words, of the JFK assassination.

In this debate, Buzzanco makes the important points that people need to look at the evidence, the documents and archives of what Kennedy actually did, rather than anecdotes and stories told long after the fact.